Repercussions launches on FBi Click – listen to first two episodes

My new radio show, Repercussions, has launched on FBi’s new station, FBi Click. Every week on Repercussions I investigate the infinite connections in electronic music, past present and future. Each 60-minute show follows an artist, genre, producer, subject, location or label and explores the influential tracks that exist in their orbit – before, during and after.

The first episode is titled “In The Beginning” and is a collection of important touchstones in electronic music from the early 70s through to the mid 90s, including artists such as Kraftwerk, Donna Summer, Afrika Bambaataa, Severed Heads, The Art Of Noise, Aphex Twin and many more.

Download Repercussions #1 – In The Beginning

Repercussions #2 features our first Guest Selector – Sydney electronic music producer and DJ Gareth Psaltis, discusses the artists and tracks that influenced his work, including music from Autechre, Kanding Ray, Surgeon, Voices From The Lake and more.

Download Repercussions #2 – Selector: Gareth Psaltis

Emily Grantham Podcast

Wood & Wire artist Emily Grantham played a special live-to-air set on the New Weird Australia radio show on 15th March 2012, and talked about her work and future plans. The set featured four new tracks, not available on her Chocolate Syrup record – the second release on the Wood & Wire label. The interview and live set are now available as a podcast from New Weird Australia:

DOWNLOADNWA Podcast #25. Emily Grantham, Live-to-air Set & Interview

Pivot | Cities

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I’m over 2008 already. In fact, two months ago I bought a 2009 diary and I’ve been using it ever since. My personal indignation about all that was unfavourable in 2008 is surely not replicated by Australia’s Pivot. By anyone’s standards, they’ve had an outstanding year: signed to Warp Records, released a sensational album (‘O Soundtrack My Heart’), had an EP remixed by Clark and Rustie, played with Sigur Ros, toured the world. And that was just yesterday afternoon. With so little left to prove, I suspect 2009 might be a quiet one for Pivot. No, sorry, they’re touring Australia next month with Gary Numan – my mistake.

As if their schedule wasn’t rammed to the hilt already, the overachievers also found time to make their own podcast mix series, ‘O Download My Heart’ featuring songs and sounds inspired by their activities over the last twelve months. ‘Cosmic Gods Of Synth’ gave us their tribute to the keyboard wizards of yesteryear (Jean Michel Jarre being reawoken for that one, presumably with his light harp intact), ‘Australian Music’ thankfully reappraised all that is cited worldwide about the Aussie scene, and ‘Autobahn Favourites’ was a 200kph ride through Krautrock old and new. The latest episode ‘Cities’ records their “European Odyssey” with a themed podcast featuring Steve Reich, Trans Am, Flying Lotus, Talking Heads and Scott Walker. One hopes that’s the last instalment in the series – they’re making the rest of us look slack by comparison.

Pivot – Cities | mp3

Subscribe to Pivot podcast series via http://pivotpivot.net/podcast/odownloadmyheart.xml.

Fat Planet – Lindstrom (Norway) Interview

August 2007 saw the release of Norwegian producer Lindstrom‘s contribution to the ‘Late Night Tales‘ series, pulling together a selection of some of his favourite tunes that document the wee small hours. Previous contributors include Four Tet, Air and The Flaming Lips, so he’s amongst extremely fine company. The album came off the back of a couple of hugely successful years for Lindstrom – from the out-of-control breakthrough track ‘I Feel Space’, to the growth of his label ‘Feedelity‘ and the recent media buzz around his alleged position of the head of the ‘cosmic disco‘ genre. Hear what Hans-Peter had to say on some of these topics by listening to the Fat Planet interview, originally broadcast on FBi Radio on 18th July.

Fat Planet – Amon Tobin (Brazil) Interview

2007 saw the Australian release of Brazilian Amon Tobin’s studio album ‘The Foley Room’. as the title suggests, Tobin had worked to evolve from using vinyl sample sources to ‘found’ or ‘constructed’ sounds. It’s a huge testament to Tobin that the results remained defiantly accessible, and – unlike Herbert’s similar ‘Plate de Jour’ project – never fall into the realms of abstract sound art. The album, released through Ninja Tune, came with a documentary that documented the painstaking processes Tobin undertook in the construction of this record.

Tobin was in Sydney for a DJ show in January 2007, and I he joined me on the Fat Planet radio show to discuss ‘The Foley Room’ alongside his then recent soundtrack work on the Splinter Cell 3 video game.

Fat Planet – Frederic Galliano (Kuduro Sound System) Interview

in october last year, i posted some music from a genre emerging out of angola known as kuduro – a fusion of local african sounds with ragga, techno, hip hop and caribbean influences. shortly thereafter, i interviewed french producer frederic galliano for fbi radio, discussing the first kuduro album to be released outside of angola – entitled ‘frederic galliano presents kuduro sound system’. galliano wrote the album with a local dj, kito da machina, and a group of “kudoristas” (anagolan mcs) – dog murras, pinta tirru, gata agressiva, zoca zoca, pai diesel and the original creator of kuduro, tony amado.

you can listen to the podcast of the interview above (featuring some short excerpts from the album), but if you’re too ‘time poor’ to check the podcast in its entirety, here’s a transcript. read it with a strong french accent.

fat planet: to the uninitiated, can you give us a brief background to kuduro?

frederic galliano: kuduoro is music typically from angola, created by tony amado ten years ago. when amado created kuduro, he was thinking about dance music at that time such as crystal waters and reel to reel. he mixed the kick of that kind of house music with programming inspired by traditional carnival music from angola. it was a strange idea and the result is of course this really fast mixture between techno and zouk. now kuduro is completely national, listened to by people from cape verde, mozambique – and also from portugal too. i’m now trying to bring this music to the world because i believe it is the first original electronic music from africa – and it really is a miracle.

how does this kind of electronic music sit with the congotronics series that was released by crammed discs last year?

congrotronics is not electronic music, it’s acoustic music with electronic amplification – but the realisation is not electronic. kuduro is electronic – the dj makes the music, just like i do. they have a computer, and that’s all. computer, vocals – that’s all. kuduro is like techno, it’s like hip hop, you know? that’s the real difference.

and what about the lyrical content?

it’s like hip hop in that it’s a social movement, originally created by poor people – so the lyrics contain critiques about society, critiques about politics – they explain the social situation of poor people. politicians don’t really like this music, because it it critical of them, but in fact it’s an obligation in angola to know about kuduro – because this is the only contemporary music that genuinely represents angolan people.

how did you first come in contact with kuduro?

it was two years ago when i was touring in angola with my project, the african divas. when i first heard kuduro, i felt it was completely new, completely fresh, yet typically african. and at the same time, the dj was working just like me. it was amazing.

and then how did the ‘kuduro sound system’ album come about?

i went back to angola and recorded the album in angola in two weeks. i worked with a dj called kito da machina and some of the best kudoristas around.

were you the first producer from outside angola to work with local kudoristas?

dog murras, he’s the big star of kuduro, he introduced me at a live show recently and said “galliano is the first white guy to do kuduro”. this is true, because i’m the only white guy that’s travelled in angola and work with the kudoristas. you know you have some kuduro in portugal, but the angolan people say this is “kuduro de blanco”, “kuduro of the white people” because it is really cheap. some people think kuduro is really easy to do, but it’s not – it’s really complex music. the programming is based on traditional music from angola and the creation is hard, because it is so strict. that’s why i’ve travelled so many times to angola, to learn exactly how to do it. now, i’m not the best kuduro programmer, but today some kudoristas say “galliano can do it”, because my feeling is like their feeling. i will be there again in january to learn to new propositions, new feelings.

do you think it’ll be easy for kuduro to break out and translate across the world?

i’m sure it’ll be successful all over the world, because this music is completely new and completely fresh – and i haven’t heard new music like that for over ten years. also, you can mix this with house, with techno, with drum and bass – that’s what is so crazy about kuduro, its a mix between dance, ragga, techno, zouk, traditional african music and brazilian. it’s strong, it’s funny and it’s easy to listen to.

the artists and writers who are now championing kuduro are the ones who championed funk carioca not that long ago. do you see any relationship between the two genres?

there is no formal similarity between funk cariaca and kuduro. funk cariaca, baile funk, is a sort of hip hop, the beats are not original. the originality of baile funk is the social situation behind it, but the beats are really easy to produce. it’s an old school style with a west coast sound. kuduro is completely different. the feeling is the same because of the portuguese language, but the realisation is totally different. it’s easy to produce a beat of baile funk, but kuduro? no, no – it’s not easy, it’s really complex.

kuduro-sound-system.blogspot.com.au

Fat Planet – Annie (Norway) Interview

this fat planet podcast is taken from earlier this year when annie‘s anniemal album finally received an australian release. on the phone from norway, annie and i talked about finding inspiration in rave parties, metal, madonna and jap-pop; about how the album was nearly derailed following the death of collaborator tore andreas kroknes; and how pitchfork’s ‘single of the year’ award led to annie clocking up a guest list of over 7000 people in new york city.

to puff up the album release, annie rolled into sydney last week for a dj-set. sadly, i couldn’t make the dj gig, but by all accounts, annie should have left the decks well alone. ‘a series of train wrecks’ was one phrase being thrown around the morning after. there’s a downbeat review here. but i’m no hater, i love ‘anniemal’ – i just wish australia would get off the block quicker with such things.

DOWNLOAD: annie ‘chewing gum (fakeID remix)’

the above mp3 dropped onto the web this week – a bootleg re-rub of ‘chewing gum’ from bastard pop aficionado, fakeID. further web hunting reveals a couple of extra annie mp3 freebies. register at K7 and you’ll get the new track ‘the wedding’ from her dj kicks compilation (delve deeper into K7 to purchase a rare digital e.p. featuring a remix of this track from lindstrom). register again with 7 digital and you’ll cop the best of the three – the y$s productions remix of ‘always too late’, from the team who recently dropped mixes for m.i.a. and lady sovereign – ch-ching!

for your dollar, i advise a hunt for the patrick wolf remix of ‘always too late’ – of the many annie remixes around, this one bags the top spot.

Fat Planet – Filastine (U.S.) Interview

A ‘Fat Planet’ interview with Grey Filastine, originally broadcast on FBI Radio on 8th October 2006. Grey discusses his previous work with Tchkung! and his misadventures with the Infernal Noise Brigade, then bringing us up to speed with the genesis of Filastine and his audio travels around the world.

DOWNLOAD: FILASTINE judas goat (terror mix)

DOWNLOAD: FILASTINE figuig

regular readers will know i’m a fan of dj rupture (aka jace clayton) – undoubtedly at the forefront of marrying global sounds with radical contemporary production. think ‘afro house’ and then think of its exact polar opposite – and that’s where you’ll find rupture.

rupture‘s label soot has previously brought us egypt’s incomparable mutamassik as well as releases from japan’s ove naxxand jace’s own nettle project; and their next release comes from seattle-based solo producer filastine. having studied rhythms and worked with percussionists worldwide, filastine filters all those experiences into his new album ‘burn it’ (available now through boomkat).

short album samples on filastine’s site suggest that ‘burn it’ will deliver a diverse mix of hip hop, broken beat, ragga and deep electronic dub, all fused together with vocal samples and field recordings that represent an incredible diversity of music from around the world. note, once more, the term ‘world music’ does not apply.

the above remix of ‘judas goat’ kicks off with a feeling that you’re falling into a deep mantra, reflecting on bush’s ‘war on terror’ – and as you’re drifting through that elongated moment of discovery, filastine’s drops a mix of heavy dub (double-)basslines and eastern percussion and pipes. the original version of the track can be found on a recently released soot 7″, b/w a dubhop excursion with sweet french vocals (clip).

the second mp3 comes via comfort stand, described as a “community-driven label where all releases are free … striving to bring you recordings that we find interesting, compelling and downright enjoyable. everybody needs free music.” well said. the mp3 album is called ‘people doing strange things with electricity too‘ and is 25 tracks of artists that i’ve never heard of. i sense of morning-worth of downloading approaching.

more filastine: check out parts one and two of his mix as part of sonar calibrado (with maga bo), and this field recording entitled ‘mob destroys bank in argentina’.